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Nobbie

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About Nobbie

  • Rank
    Boxa - Guru
  • Birthday 06/29/1967

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Wilmslow, Cheshire
  • Interests
    Triathlon, Gardening, Tinkering

Previous Fields

  • My Ride
    1999 2.5 Boxster 986 Tiptronic S, Pug 107

Recent Profile Visitors

1,945 profile views
  1. I was looking forward to getting cheap insurance with SAGA after everyone said how cheap they were and then they quoted me £600🤔, went with LV this year for £150🙂 Where can I buy that phone? Would suit me perfectly🤣
  2. It seems pretty cheap considering the potential to claim, so I suspect it is the sort of policy people take out and then don't get round to actually claiming on as they can't be bothered to dig out the paperwork. If you know you will get any damage repaired when it happens then it's probably a pretty good deal if you are keeping the car for the full 3 years.
  3. I remember someone not being very happy with the standard of repair done under their insurance policy as you had no choice over who did the repair, so the insurance company will likely choose a cheap one. How precious are you about the wheels? Is it to avoid damage costs at the end of a lease? If so, you,may find that the repairs don't meet the standards of the lease company inspector.
  4. That's odd, they must have changed it as I had the PCGB Locktons policy a couple of years ago and I don't have a garage and I'm pretty sure I would have been asked or checked🤔
  5. I did mine a couple of weeks ago as it had to come off to access the PS pump. I was a bit foxed when I found a vacuum pipe at each side, but turns out this is only for Tip cars. There is a nut holding the TB to the engine which was tricky to remove as access under the TB was tight. Cleaning was straightforward with a bit of carb cleaner, but there was a fair bit of oil in the black tube leading to the inlets, so I think my AOS maybe past it's best, but I didn't want to get further involved and left it for another day. Re-assembled and took it for a good thrash and all worked fine. Haven't touched the MAF as it seems to be working fine. Maybe when I change the AOS I'll give it a clean. I only did mine as I had to take it off anyway. Not sure I'd bother taking it out just to clean it if the car is otherwise running well. Always the risk you'll disturb of break something as chap above did.
  6. I was insuring my Spitfire with them until I sold it a couple of years ago. Only £100 as well, although I only really thought of it as basic legal cover and expected little more of it. Never needed to change to policy details or make a claim, which is when you tend to find out why it is so cheap🤔
  7. You can only just see the new line going into the junction. I only needed to take the headlight unit itself out. I was using copper and bent that first bend after the junction after I'd flared the end with the union on it. May have used an old socket with a groove round it to form the tight bend as the brake pipe fitted nicely in the groove to avoid crushing.
  8. I think they mentioned it in this thread
  9. To help with getting air out of the system it is useful to leave the back of the car on axle stands with the bleed valve open when you first run it upto temperature with a few revs.
  10. Dodgy line in OSF wheelarch😳, literally fell apart as it was removed. These are useful Need to shield bits from heat and best to use a proper flared brake spanner Useful to make up some connectors to blank off when you remove pipes, just a connector with the copper pipe crimped with pliers Need to drop front ARB to get pipe across front of car. You need to feed in the pipe across the rear from the middle of the open clamshell/engine cover all the way and then feed it all the way back to the other wheel. No problems doing on axle stands, patience in removing the old connector is key as it would be easy to break things by being too rough. Lots of heat/cold cycles and tighten nuts slightly first to break corrosion before undoing. It was easier than replacing my exhaust manifolds😀
  11. I replaced the whole lot as once I started looking closely the rust was quite widespread. Worst area was just under the OSF inner wheelarch which you won't see normally unless you take the wheel off and get your head in there with a torch. You may be luckier than me. I gave some tips in my running report (last page) There is one line from the distribution point in the NSF wheelarch to a junction halfway down the sill where it splits into two lines. One goes to the NSR caliper and the other goes via the NSR wheelarch and then across the bulkhead behind the engine to the OSR caliper. On mine, the corrosion on this line wasn't too bad and it is a bugger to replace, so if it's just the front to rear lines that are rusted, might be more practice to put a joint around the NSR wheelarch somewhere. I've got some more photos from when I did the job if there is anything you want some more detail on.
  12. Good find, I used similar, but they were 125mm in length and I had to cut them down. Just checked on them over a year later and all is good.
  13. I'm intrigued that there is a car that it is not feasible to own without commuting in it🤔 What car is it that compels you to commute? Vectra?
  14. It also covers your spouse or partner driving any car.
  15. Great persistence in not letting yourself be fobbed off that it can't be done. Hopefully save a few other forum members a big bill in the future🙂
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