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After my recent post with regard my engine failure I am still in 2 minds what to do with the car. It appears from initial checks to be IMS failure and rough rebuild costs are circa 6-8k for my existing engine.

I have looked at Douglas valley and they have a used engine with similar mileage 56k for around £2600 plus shipping. They advise that it will be checked before shipping and I will receive a report on engine including compression test results etc.

Anyone used these for engines in the past and would appreciate any thoughts !!

 

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Not used them for an engine but have had a few parts from them, always as described and they have a good reputation that I’m sure they dont want trashed over selling a dodgy engine, but you are buying blind and its difficult to know what that engine will offer in the future.

Edited by the baron

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It's normally nice to see and hear an engine running in situ. 

There are other tests that can be done too like checking the cam deviation. But you can't do this if the engine is out and not hooked up to an ECU. 

Other mitigation you can do is replace the IMS shaft and bearing if you have an engine in a pallet. I think with it out you can go further than the more usual bearing only change. You could go for the latest revision shaft with bigger bearing. 

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Would it not be better to go for a higher mileage engine? If yours went at around the same mileage, this one also has potential to do the same. I'm sure I've read that if an engine gets to 70-80k it's a pretty safe bet to say the IMS won't fail?

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1 hour ago, edc said:

Other mitigation you can do is replace the IMS shaft and bearing if you have an engine in a pallet. I think with it out you can go further than the more usual bearing only change. You could go for the latest revision shaft with bigger bearing. 

Sound advice but check with a specialist before ordering the parts as I think the engine needs to be split to install it as the latest iteration of IMS and bearing assembly is too big to fit to an assembled engine.

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53 minutes ago, GmanB said:

Would it not be better to go for a higher mileage engine? If yours went at around the same mileage, this one also has potential to do the same. I'm sure I've read that if an engine gets to 70-80k it's a pretty safe bet to say the IMS won't fail?

im on nearly 75000 and it runs like silk so good advise , its a a tad hit and mis with IMS but I understand the early engine failure rate is much lower due to bigger and double row bearings, 

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I've used Steve at Douglas Valley Breakers for an engine in the past (Honda S2000). They sent photos of the compression test results and the donor car. Was a few years back so suspect they could provide a video these days. The engine was good and arrived nicely palleted as described. Not the cheapest suppliers but they seem to do it properly and have a long record of happy customers. I DIY'd my S2000 install (ridiculously easy on that car - designed by the Honda F1 engineers) which meant the warranty didn't count (pro-install only) but never needed it over the next few years. I'd use them again.

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I've had a few bits from them, all priced well. I bought a 987/997 shifter from them for less than what they get advertised for privately.

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Me too. I bought a set of 17" twists a few months back from them for a good price. They arrived quickly, properly palletted and with virtually new, branded tyres.

YMMV

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22 hours ago, GmanB said:

Would it not be better to go for a higher mileage engine? If yours went at around the same mileage, this one also has potential to do the same. I'm sure I've read that if an engine gets to 70-80k it's a pretty safe bet to say the IMS won't fail?

No disrespect but bearings don't improve with age or mileage. Mine was a double row and failed at just over 110000. It seems to be a bit if an internet myth that higher mileage cars are less prone to failure and doesn't add up from an engineering point of view.

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Would it not be worth while buying the low mileage engine and having the IMS done by a local Indy , with the engine out of the car the cost shouldn't be outrageous ?  

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1 hour ago, jonogt6 said:

No disrespect but bearings don't improve with age or mileage. Mine was a double row and failed at just over 110000. It seems to be a bit if an internet myth that higher mileage cars are less prone to failure and doesn't add up from an engineering point of view.

I agree with you. It's just what I've read multiple times, so could be a myth, total bs or just fag packet engineers. I did put a question mark on the end to be fair. It does sound like you have been terribly unlucky though... aren't the double rows allegedly more reliable (again, just what I've read)? 

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Actually if the engine was out I would do the job myself,  its not that hard and plenty of video step by step to help ya..

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1 hour ago, jonogt6 said:

No disrespect but bearings don't improve with age or mileage. Mine was a double row and failed at just over 110000. It seems to be a bit if an internet myth that higher mileage cars are less prone to failure and doesn't add up from an engineering point of view.

Owning a 73k mile 986, much as I'd like to believe that IMS bearings are unlikely to fail once past 70k miles, as an engineer, I couldn't agree with you more. I suspect the myth is a risky form of clutching at straws...😟

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1 hour ago, jonogt6 said:

No disrespect but bearings don't improve with age or mileage. Mine was a double row and failed at just over 110000. It seems to be a bit if an internet myth that higher mileage cars are less prone to failure and doesn't add up from an engineering point of view.

Its abit of a Lottery I've put a video on here about it   , at the end of the day the IMS bearing is really nothing more than a wheel bearing as as peeps might know , the issue is cost   ,,  the best thing really is if ya clutch is gone then get it done with it as it's just behind there

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1 hour ago, chrishak said:

Owning a 73k mile 986, much as I'd like to believe that IMS bearings are unlikely to fail once past 70k miles, as an engineer, I couldn't agree with you more. I suspect the myth is a risky form of clutching at straws...😟

My Indy had a 986 S  in his workshop just a while back with a confirmed IMS failure on 128,000k. It was in lovely knick too. 😩

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45 minutes ago, Topbox said:

My Indy had a 986 S  in his workshop just a while back with a confirmed IMS failure on 128,000k. It was in lovely knick too. 😩

I am on 133,000! It's a Tiptronic so never a reason to get it changed "while your in there"  Guess I will just keep changing the oil every 5k and enjoy it. 😲

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3 hours ago, GmanB said:

I agree with you. It's just what I've read multiple times, so could be a myth, total bs or just fag packet engineers. I did put a question mark on the end to be fair. It does sound like you have been terribly unlucky though... aren't the double rows allegedly more reliable (again, just what I've read)? 

It  certainly makes sense that a double row is going to be stronger than a single. Luckily mine gave me a degree of warning by making a horrendous noise so the engine wasn't a complete write off and is still going strong 4 yrs later.

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3 hours ago, GmanB said:

I agree with you. It's just what I've read multiple times, so could be a myth, total bs or just fag packet engineers. I did put a question mark on the end to be fair. It does sound like you have been terribly unlucky though... aren't the double rows allegedly more reliable (again, just what I've read)? 

Seems from my reading is that the higher risk is if the car has been parked on a slope allowing oil to seep into the bearing seal and then sit inside the shaft causing eventual washing out of the grease leading to failure.  If you can find this out in the history of the car would be useful if very unlikely.  Park it on the flat if you can and hope previous owners have too.....

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2 hours ago, JohnnyUK said:

I am on 133,000! It's a Tiptronic so never a reason to get it changed "while your in there"  Guess I will just keep changing the oil every 5k and enjoy it. 😲

Great stuff and good luck, there is no way of knowing if something rather terminal break or not, luck of the draw but for sure good maintainence  must help 👍

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The “myth” was a little bit observed reports, that there were several in the first years and less later, and that a couple of IMS specialists like Autofarm started to consider that the failures were due to poor tolerances in a batch of engine blocks. 

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Think you are in safer hands with this place, there is always Prestige breakers in Leeds.

If you are not fitting the engine yourself, might be best to get the garage to source you an engine.  That way they are liable for everything, well at least for the next 6/12 months.

getting the cam shaft deviation after the engine has been fitted, should good you some insight for how how much chain stretch it has.

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This option does not seem to make financial sense to me, would 

it not be better to source a decent replacement 986 and then 

strip/sell your present broken 986 if possible?

 

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Appreciate that an engine is more of a commitment but I bought a boot lid from them which they were very careful to describe as not being in brilliant condition. It exceeded my expectations as did the speed of dispatch and the quality of packaging. Very helpful guys. 

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