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Brexit Insurance and Driving Dilemmas


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Since 2011 I have run a company in the UK whilst my family remained living and working in Ireland. This hasn't really caused any problems, I drove back and forth in my UK registered car without any issue and kept my EU licence which allowed me to drive my own car and the family car when I am in Ireland.

From Jan 1st it appears I have to get a green card every time I want to drive to Ireland which is a pain but I can live with it, the biggest issue is I have to give up my EU licence and get a UK one which means that I can no longer be covered on the Irish family car.

The overall changes at the ports (I have already witnessed and been victim of increased customs procedures) means that I may well choose to fly home now rather than drive, especially as I can no longer bring product across with the same ease (it often used to pay fro my trip). However, if I do this, I will not have any transport once I get home for the reasons above.

At the moment, a return to full time living in Ireland seems likely even though UK and Irish accountants have advised against it, if that happens the Boxster will have to go as owning a 3.2 Porsche in the Irish Republic is not for the light of pocket.

I would be interested to hear from anyone in similar circumstances or anyone with greater knowledge than me on this scenario.

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I have no facts or experience to back up this - this is just shooting the breeze

Are you ( or are you eligible to be) an Irish Citizen - if so - dual passport is a possibility - in which case your Irish half can have an EU license?

Or - are you able to take a driving test in Ireland to get an irish license?

Is it worth a call to your family car insurers to see what their take is - or possibly shopping around for insurance companies who would extend cover?

 

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1 hour ago, Paul P said:

 

I have no facts or experience to back up this - this is just shooting the breeze

 

I’m the same position as above however I was under the impression that there was a pre-existing “treaty” between the UK and Ireland that covered driving licenses and other day to day inter country document portability - was also under the impression that this remained in place regardless of the EU/UK agreement. 

If that’s changed then I can see it affecting more Irish than UK nationals simply on the balance of flow of people between the countries. 

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8 hours ago, Paul P said:

I have no facts or experience to back up this - this is just shooting the breeze

Are you ( or are you eligible to be) an Irish Citizen - if so - dual passport is a possibility - in which case your Irish half can have an EU license?

Or - are you able to take a driving test in Ireland to get an irish license?

Is it worth a call to your family car insurers to see what their take is - or possibly shopping around for insurance companies who would extend cover?

 

I could qualify for Irish citizenship by marriage if I hadn't been living outside the ROI for the last few years, but I have so no unfortunately. I think taking the test again is a bit of a last resort, I might well try applying for a duplicate on the grounds of loss before turning over the original for a UK licence though.

The family insurers thing is interesting, I cannot say too much on an open forum but we caught them out in a GDPR breach and they had to back off their line of questioning. I will be shopping around for an annual green card on my UK insurance though.

6 hours ago, map said:

I’m the same position as above however I was under the impression that there was a pre-existing “treaty” between the UK and Ireland that covered driving licenses and other day to day inter country document portability - was also under the impression that this remained in place regardless of the EU/UK agreement. 

If that’s changed then I can see it affecting more Irish than UK nationals simply on the balance of flow of people between the countries. 

Not quite, Irish citizens can use their licences in UK ad infinitum  as far as I can tell, this is probably to keep the northern issue under control. I can use my Irish licence until it runs out, I reach 70 or up to 3 years after entry into the UK. It is the latter that screws me.

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3 minutes ago, Terryg said:

Not quite, Irish citizens can use their licences in UK ad infinitum  as far as I can tell, this is probably to keep the northern issue under control. I can use my Irish licence until it runs out, I reach 70 or up to 3 years after entry into the UK. It is the latter that screws me.

So in this case there’s no parity for UK citizens compared to their Irish equivalents.

Fascinating - I wonder if there’s a “human rights violation” here on the basis that over the same grounds one group is being treated differently to another.

Do you want to be that test case? I wouldn’t but it is interesting given how everyone has rights.....

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1 minute ago, map said:

So in this case there’s no parity for UK citizens compared to their Irish equivalents.

Fascinating - I wonder if there’s a “human rights violation” here on the basis that over the same grounds one group is being treated differently to another.

Do you want to be that test case? I wouldn’t but it is interesting given how everyone has rights.....

Actually no that cannot be fully correct otherwise I would not have to change my licence. To be honest my head is fried trying to make sense of all the new rules, I think it is they don't need the green card at all, their insurance covers them in the UK without one , this makes more sense in terms of Northern Ireland. and would be an essential element of the agreement if we value peace over and above bits of paper.

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I hope you find a way of sorting this. I have noticed that I am no longer covered for mainland Europe on the car insurance and my provider has divided Europe into 3 for the (increasing) additional cost depending where you want to go. Basically, France/belgium/holland being the entry zone 1, and then further afield increases the cost.

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